Deathlog 2018: Part 1

   

     © CKK Corporation / Turtle Releasing Org.

    

As 2018 nears its end, I thought I’d mention those many writers, musicians, performers, artists and personalities who passed away during the first half of the year – folk who’ve inspired, entertained and generally made life a bit more interesting for me.  Links are provided for the people whose deaths were commemorated by entries on this blog. 

    

January 2018 saw a quadruple-whammy of music-related deaths.  On January 10th, we lost Fast Eddie Clarke, last surviving member of the formidable original line-up of Motörhead; on January 15th, Dolores O’Riordan, singer, songwriter and musician with the massively popular (for a time) Irish band the Cranberries; on January 20th, Jim Rodford, bass player with the Zombies, Argent and, for two decades from the 1970s to the 1990s, the Kinks; and on January 24th, the relentlessly experimental, prolific and grumpy Mark E. Smith of the ever shape-shifting post-punk band the Fall.

    

Meanwhile, mid-January witnessed the loss of two actors I remember fondly.  On January 15th, we said goodbye to Peter Wyngarde, suave, stylish and impressively moustached star of TV shows Department S (1969-70) and Jason King (1971-72); though connoisseurs of horror movies would argue his finest hours came with his small but terrifying role in the classic The Innocents (1961) and his lead role in the underrated Night of the Eagle (1962), while connoisseurs of trivia cherish the fact that as a teenager he was interned in the same Japanese prisoner of war camp as author J.G. Ballard.  The next day saw the departure of seemingly indefatigable American actor Bradford Dillman, whose CV included such lovably ropy cinema and TV movies as Fear No Evil (1969), The Mephisto Waltz (1971), Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971), Moon of the Wolf (1972), Chosen Survivors (1974), Bug (1975), The Swarm (1978), Sudden Impact (1983) and Lords of the Deep (1988).  Though his best role in my opinion was in the original, Joe Dante-directed, John Sayles-scripted Piranha (1978).

   

                                                                             © ITC Entertainment

         

In the literary world, legendary science fiction and fantasy writer Ursula K. Le Guin died on January 22nd.  Soon after came the deaths of two well-regarded horror writers.  Jack Ketchum, author of 1981’s Off Season and 1989’s The Girl Next Door and co-writer of 2010’s The Woman and its 2011 film adaptation, died on January 24th; while David Case, whose 1971 short story Fengriffin was filmed in 1973 as And Now the Screaming Starts with a top-notch cast of Peter Cushing, Stephanie Beachum, Ian Ogilvy, Patrick Magee and Herbert Lom, died on February 3rd

    

Passing away on February 4th was the actor John Mahoney, much loved as Kelsey Grammar’s blue-collar dad Martin Crane in the sitcom Frasier (1993-2004).  Five days later saw the death of John Gavin, the American actor who was the hero (as opposed to Anthony Perkins’ anti-hero) of Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960) and a credible Julius Caesar in Stanley Kubrick’s Spartacus that same year.  Among other things, Gavin came close to playing James Bond in 1970’s Diamonds are Forever, before a hefty wage-offer lured Sean Connery back to the role.  By an unhappy coincidence, Lewis Gilbert, director of old-school Bond epics You Only Live Twice (1967), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1978), died the same month, on February 23rd.  And Peter Miles, the prolific British character actor who between the 1960s and 1980s turned up in such TV shows as Z-Cars, Survivors, The Sweeney, Poldark, Blake’s 7 and Bergerac, died on February 26th.  Perhaps best-known for playing Nyder, the conniving, Nazi-esque sidekick to the Daleks’ creator Davros in the classic 1975 Doctor Who adventure Genesis of the Daleks, Miles was the first of several veteran British TV actors to expire in 2018.

   

                                                                                                         © BBC

   

Indeed, a slew of British TV fixtures died the following month.   These were the relentless Liverpudlian comedian Ken Dodd, who was still performing marathon four-hour shows (“You think you can get away but you can’t.  I’ll follow you home and shout jokes through your letterbox!”) almost until his death on March 11th at the age of 90; Jim Bowen, beloved host of 1980s darts-themed quiz-show Bullseye, who died on March 14th; and Bill Maynard, star of 1970s sitcom Oh No, It’s Selwyn Froggitt! (1976-78) and several Carry On movies, who died on March 30th.

       

Meanwhile, a fixture of American TV, David Ogden Stiers, died on March 3rd.  I’ll always remember Stiers from the classic anti-war sitcom M*A*S*H, the last six seasons of which (1978-83) featured him in the role of the amusingly pompous and truculent but essentially good-hearted Charles Emerson Winchester III.  The same day another American actor, Frank Doubleday, passed away – Doubleday was responsible for the most shockingly senseless murder in movie history, playing a gang-member who guns down a little girl at an ice cream van in John Carpenter’s cheap but masterly Assault on Precinct 13 (1976). 

    

Bowing out on March 14th was Stephen Hawking, proof that having Motor Neuron Disease needn’t prevent you from having the finest mind on the planet – or having the ability to poke fun at yourself by making guest appearances in TV shows like Star Trek: The Next Generation and The Simpsons.  Philip Kerr, Edinburgh-born author of the ‘Berlin Noir’ Bernie Gunther crime novels, died on March 23rd.  And on March 20th, at the age of just 38, Kak Channthy, singer with the splendidly offbeat, catchy and trippy band Cambodian Space Project, was killed in a traffic accident in Phnom Penh.

    

                                       From the Khmer Times Daily News Digest

    

April saw the deaths of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975) and Amadeus (1986) director Milos Foreman on April 13th; soldier and actor R. Lee Emery – who started off on Stanley Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket (1987) as a technical advisor but proved so hardcore that Kubrick soon cast him in the role of the fearsome Gunnery Sergeant Hartman – on April 15th; actress Pamela Gidley from David Lynch’s Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992) on April 16th; John Stride, one of those afore-mentioned prolific British TV character actors, on April 20th; and diminutive actor Verne Troyer, who’ll be forever remembered as Mini-Me in the Austin Powers movies, on April 20th.  Personally, I liked Troyer best for his performance in Terry Gilliam’s 2009 film The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus.

         

On April 29th, versatile screenwriter Trevor Preston died.  Preston’s CV ranged from the gritty TV crime shows Out (1978) and Fox (1980) to the popular kids’ fantasy series Ace of Wands (1970-72) to the fascinatingly oddball snooker / musical / horror film Billy the Kid and the Green Baize Vampire (1987).

      

May got off with a melancholy start with two much-loved performers apparently taking their own lives: Scott Hutchinson, singer-songwriter and guitarist with Scottish Borders indie band Frightened Rabbit, who disappeared at the Firth of Forth on May 9th and whose body was discovered there the following day; and Canadian actress and activist Margot Kidder, Lois Lane to Christopher Reeve’s Clark Kent in the Superman movies of 1978, 80, 83 and 87, who died of an overdose on May 13th.  Heavyweight American writers Tom Wolfe and Philip Roth passed away on May 14th and May 22nd respectively.  And departing on May 21st was the towering (six foot, six inches) American actor Clint Walker, star of the TV western show Cheyenne from 1955 to 1963 and one of the twelve military convicts in Robert Aldrich’s The Dirty Dozen (1967).  Two decades later, Walker would supply one of the voices for the title characters of Joe Dante’s Small Soldiers (1998) alongside other members of the Dozen like George Kennedy, Ernest Borgnine and Jim Brown.

     

Japanese actress Yuriko Hoshi, whose 90 films included some fun kaiju ones featuring Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah, died on May 17th, while British actor Glynn Edwards, who turned up in such British movie classics as Zulu (1964) and Get Carter (1971) but will be best remembered for playing Dave, the congenial barman at Arthur Daley’s watering hole the Winchester Club in the TV show Minder (1979-94), died on May 23rd.  May 20th saw the death of yet another Stanley Kubrick collaborator, graphic designer and film-poster artist Bill Gold.  Among the hundreds of posters Gold produced, it’s a toss-up between his one for Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange (1971) and his one for The Exorcist (1973) about which is the most iconic.

   

                                                     © Warner Bros.
                                                        © Warner Bros.

    

June 8th saw the deaths of globetrotting TV chef Anthony Bourdain, and actress Eunice Gayson, the very first cinematic Bond girl (Sylvia Trench in 1962’s Dr No and 1963’s From Russia With Love), and blues-rock guitarist Danny Kirwan, who played with Fleetwood Mac until 1972 (i.e. back in the days when they were good).  June was also when two notable drummers passed away: Nick Knox, who played for 14 years with psychobilly legends the Cramps, on June 15th and Vinnie Paul of the heavy metal band Pantera on June 22nd.  Actress Maria Rohm, wife of the prolific British film producer Harry Alan Towers and frequent star of movies made by the equally prolific Spanish director Jess Franco, died on June 18th.  One day later, so did the kindly, smart and communicative primate Koko the Gorilla.

      

Science fiction and fantasy author, notorious curmudgeon, all-round personality and a hero of mine (especially during my teens) Harlan Ellison died on June 27th.  Two days later saw the passing of the legendary comic artist and writer Steve Dikto, who co-created Marvel Comics superheroes Spiderman and Dr Strange with Stan Lee.  Later on, of course, Lee would be a casualty of 2018 too.

     

And those were only the deaths during the first half of 2018.  I’ll post an entry about 2018’s second half later this month – and, alas, there are many more still to come.

    

Lucifer no longer over Lancashire

 

© BBC

 

According to the Book of Job, Chapter 1, Verse 21, “the Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away.”  That maxim has been demonstrated this month.  January 15th saw a star-studded concert held at Dublin’s National Concert Hall to celebrate the fact that Irish singer, songwriter and musician Shane MacGowan had celebrated his 60th birthday despite a lifetime of heavy-duty boozing and wild living that would cut most people down before they got anywhere near 60.  And yet, just nine days later, another musical star famous for his boozing and wild living was cut down – with a spooky symmetry, aged 60 years old too.  I’m talking about the Salford-born, Prestwich-bred Mark E. Smith, for four decades the driving force behind the great post-punk / alternative rock group the Fall.

 

(If you’re to believe MacGowan’s 2001 memoir A Drink with Shane MacGowan, he and Smith did not see eye to eye.  Though supposedly Smith once remarked, during a discussion about ecstasy: “It was horrible, it makes you fall in love with everyone.  I couldn’t keep me hands off Shane MacGowan.”)

 

To be honest, Smith’s death on January 24th shouldn’t have been surprising.  His hazardous lifestyle had lately taken its toll on his appearance, to the point where he looked like a wizened cross between William S. Burroughs and Dobby the House Elf from Harry Potter.   And it wasn’t unusual for newspaper interviews with him to take place during punishing drinking sessions in various Manchester pubs.  But no matter what state he was in, Smith kept recording and performing so that today, according to Wikipedia, there are 31 Fall studio albums, 40 compilation albums, 32 live albums and five ‘part studio, part live albums’, and this remorseless, cussed work-ethic gave the impression that the curmudgeonly old devil was going to last forever.

 

When he wasn’t making music, he was famously busy hiring and firing bandmembers.  In 2011 the journalist Robert Chalmers put the number of musicians who’d collaborated with Smith in the Fall at 66.  Saying he was a hard taskmaster is possibly as much of an understatement as saying Vlad the Impaler was a bit harsh on his prisoners.  Among the multitude who’d been expelled from the band over the years was bassist, guitarist and keyboard player (and future DJ) Marc Riley, who got his marching orders in part because Smith had seen him dancing to Deep Purple in an Australian nightclub.  (“Get in the hotel and stay there till I tell you.  You don’t need to be dancing to Smoke on the Water.”)  Then again, even Riley was lucky compared to a sound engineer who, legend has it, was fired by Smith for ordering a salad.  (“The salad was the last straw.”)  Inevitably, this tribe of ex-Fall bandmembers became the subject of a book, Dave Simpson’s The Fallen in 2008.  By the time The Fallen appeared in paperback the following year, it’d acquired an additional front-cover blurb saying, “Now with added ex-members!”

 

© Step-Forward Records

 

But Smith’s reputation for brutal band-management shouldn’t be allowed to overshadow the music, much of which was great – see such songs as Industrial Estate (1978), The Container Drivers (1980), Hip Priest (1982), Who Makes the Nazis? (1982), Eat Y’Self Fitter (1983), Spoilt Victorian Child (1985), Cruiser’s Creek (1985), Lucifer over Lancashire (1985), Carry Bag Man (1988), Hit the North (1988), Edinburgh Man (1991) and Hey Luciani (1993).  Admittedly, my favourite Fall stuff comes from the first half of their 40-year career, but I find all their music fascinating – even at its most clunking, abrasive and repetitious, even when it verges on the unlistenable, it exerts a hypnotic effect thanks to Smith’s snarling stream-of-consciousness lyrics, which sound like James Joyce on crystal meth.  Only in a Fall song would you hear such demented poetry as “Got 18 months for espionage / Too much brandy for breakfast” or “The Siberian mushroom Santa / Was in fact Rasputin’s brother” or “He had a parka on and a black cardboard bishop’s hat / With a green fuzz skull and crossbones / He’d just got back from the backward kids’ party.”

 

Incidentally, if you’re intrigued by Smith’s wordplay, you should check out an Internet site called the Fall Quote Generator, which throws random Fall lyrics at you when you click on a button.  It recommends that you “use it like the I Ching, remembering to ask a question first.”  (When I asked it how Donald Trump got elected, I received the answer: “Out drift dog pet dogs street bullshit / Dog shit baby bit ass-lick dog mirror.”  So that explains it.)

 

It seemed appropriate that the Fall became the favourite band of Britain’s greatest-ever DJ John Peel, who got them to record no fewer than 24 sessions for his radio show.  Indeed, the words, “And now, in session, the mighty Fall” – intoned in Peel’s lugubrious Liverpudlian burr – were the closest thing he had to a catchphrase.

 

I first saw the Fall perform in 1985 in Aberdeen, where they were supported by the Membranes.  (Wow, whatever happened to the Membranes?  Well, actually…)  The band were impressively focused and intense – helped, I suspect, by the presence of Smith’s then-wife and guitarist Brix Smith, the woman credited with inspiring a certain tunefulness in the Fall, helping them crack the Top Forty a couple of times and generally sprucing Smith up a bit during the mid-to-late 1980s.

 

From thefall.org / © Michael Pollard

 

I saw them again in 1999 in Edinburgh, with their support band none other than former Britpop-darlings Elastica.  They seemed rather ragged this time, though Fall fans I chatted to in the crowd were simply delighted that the band had managed to deliver a coherent set.  This was a year after a notorious gig in upstate New York when a mid-performance row between Smith and the other bandmembers turned nasty, resulting in violence both onstage and off it and Smith getting arrested.

 

I didn’t see the Fall again after that but, one evening in 2004 while I was working in Dublin, I was drinking in Cassidy’s Bar on Camden Street when an acquaintance remarked, “Look over there – it’s your man Mark E. Smith from that band the Fall.”  And sure enough, there he was, enjoying a pint.  I entertained the thought of going over and saying hello but – probably wisely – decided not to.  By a sad coincidence, the very next morning, the Irish newspapers were reporting that the Fall’s great champion, John Peel, had died of a heart attack whilst on holiday in Peru.

 

Music aside, there were two reasons why I liked Mark E. Smith.  One was his considerable sardonic wit.  Interviews with him, no matter how shambolic the setting and dishevelled the interviewee, usually produced a couple of nuggets that had me laughing out loud.  This was never more so than when Smith directed his guns – or tongue – at his contemporaries and rivals in the music world.  Among those getting it in the neck from Smith over the years were Badly Drawn Boy (“fat git”), Kate Bush (“Who decided it was time to start liking her again?”), Echo and the Bunnymen (“old crocks”), Garbage (“like watching paint dry”), Bob Geldof (“a dickhead”), Sonic Youth’s Thurston Moore (“should have his rock licence revoked”), Mumford and Sons (“We were playing a festival in Dublin…  There was this other group, like, warming up… and they were terrible.  I said, ‘Shut them c*nts up!’  And they were still warming up, so I threw a bottle at them…  I just thought they were a load of retarded Irish folk singers”), Pavement (“They haven’t got an original thought in their heads”), Ed Sheeran (like “a duff singer songwriter from the 70s you find in charity shops”) and Suede (“Never heard of them,” said Smith cruelly, just after finishing a tour where Suede were the support band).

 

© Kamera Records

 

I also liked Smith because he was a lover of books – after all, he named the Fall after the 1956 Albert Camus novel La Chute – and I often got the impression during interviews that he’d be happier discussing literature than music.  He admired Kurt Vonnegut, Hunter S. Thompson, Philip K. Dick and especially the Welsh occult writer Arthur Machen.  “M.R. James is good,” he once told the Independent newspaper, “but Machen’s f**king brilliant!”

 

Then there was his love for the legendary American horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, which culminated in him doing a reading of Lovecraft’s short story The Colour out of Space for the BBC’s ‘interactive culture magazine’ Collective.  This was an unsettling experience wherein Smith’s thick Mancunian accent and the Massachusetts accents of Lovecraft’s characters battled for supremacy.  (The result was a mangled draw.)  Also, the bits during the reading where Smith paused and stuck out and wiggled his tongue were as frightening as any of the eldritch horrors in the story.

 

Anyway, there you have it.  40 years, 31 albums, 66+ bandmembers, one Fall… and one incomparable Mark E. Smith.

 

© Sanctuary Records